Our need for stories that move us

Story telling for events and special occasions

Stories help us mark significant moments, heal relationships and bring about change.

  • Funny stories give us a fresh perspective on things that we complain or stress about.
  • Heart warming stories help us bring people together as we feel compassion for one another and ourselves.
  • Disturbing stories help us ask questions about ourselves and our world.

Excellent for commTelling story at owmen's event.unity building and diversity training events.

I especially like to tell stories that cross racial boundaries and celebrate the diversity of South Africa. I want to reveal to my audience the beauty and humanity of the real South Aficans: those of us who live and breathe and have our being in the sun on our streets, in the corridors at our workplaces.

Forget the strife, let us laugh and share and build relationships across boundaries.

Choose from some of my most popular stories, or order a customised story.

Some popular stories

The Rat Goes home – A story about belonging.

They called her ‘The Rat’ from the first day she set foot in the orphanage. It was the street boys hanging like monkeys outside the gates  that gave it to her: “Hey look, today they brought in a rat!” shouted their leader, Big Daddy, a strongly built dark boy of about 12 “Hey Rat, look out  for the Cat!”, he mocked and they laughed. Read more…

Naking friends in Jozi (Johannesburg).

Imagine a 40 year old white woman on the side of Republic Road trying to hail a minibus taxi. Not too much of a stretch? Now imagine that this same woman just moved to Jo’burg. She does not know which taxi sign to use to indicate that she wants to go to Randburg, she does not know where to stand exactly so that the taxi expects that she may want a ride and finally, she only has about 40% vision, so she cannot really distinguish a taxi from a four by four family car. How likely is it that she will be able to get a taxi to stop? Read more…

Stereo types come from somewhere

I love to thwart stereotypes. When I ride my bicycle into Stellenbosch kitted out from head to foot in corporate gear complete with high heels, while all the other cyclists are heading out of town kitted out in helmets, gloves, tight padded shorts, water bottles and cycling glasses, I get a kick. On this day, though, it would not be me who broke the stereotype. Read more…

Examples of customised stories

Skin Sisters: A story about making peace with skin colour (Great for Women’s day)

I created this story for a women’s day celebration on a wine farm just outside Stellembosch.

I was always very embarrassed about my skin. It wasn’t the kind of skin that could tan evenly and become a golden brown in the sun. It wasn’t the kind of skin that freckled evenly like my sister’s either. It was not even the kind of white skin that was milky and smooth all over. Read more…

Burning Hands and the Fire Fairy

I was commissioned to write a story for a fantasy themed wedding. The story now lives in the memories of the couple and their guests who could identify themselves and their loved ones in the characters and the details of the story. Book a fairy tale for your wedding.

One day in the City of Gold in the Kingdom of the Freedom Sun a boy was born with burning hands.

“How do you know he has burning hands?” the people would ask the old  village hag.

Everyone knew that such a gift was given to one boy child every 500 years. They also knew that a gift like that only surfaced once the chosen boy is a man grown. Then the old hag would gaze into the distance and recall the ancient prophecy:  (Music)

“Every 500 years our Freedom  Sun must revive, every 1000 years Love must come alive

When 5 and 5 makes 10 Burning Hands and his Fairy will come again. Read more…

Contact me to customise a story for your event.

Read more inspiring true stories.

 

Pig catching on 22 April: Rapid Role Recasting

I have been invited to run a session at the 2016 Be the Difference Knowledge Management Summit.

On Friday I will test a Strategic Narrative Embodiment technique for the summit called “rapid Role Recasting”. For the first time, instead of using participants to embody their own stories, I will be using actors from Drama for Life. Rapid Role Recasting is aimed at understanding where we come from and where we are going. Perhaps more importantly: what is the next step on the way? We can decide on the day what ‘we’ means in this context e.g. coaches in general or pig catchers in particular?

 

It is about understanding our role in the bigger picture.

Watch this space to see how the experiment went and what Elmi Bester, the summit convener who will be attending on Friday, says about it.

Topic:    Rapid role Recasting: the thing you (or your client) need to do when you (they) don’t know what to do next.

Date:     22 April 2016

Time:    7am for 7:15 to 9:15  Research conversation (for all who are  interested in Strategic Narrative Embodiment)

9:30-12:30 Pig Catching

NOTE: the Pig catching session will start at 9:30 sharp to make the most of our time.

Facilitator: Petro Janse van Vuuren assisted by Drama for Life actors

Cost: R250 (Includes a write-up of the session)

Venue: 305 Long Ave Ferndale

Dress: Comfortable clothes you can stretch and move in

Coffee, tea, muffins and fruit on arrival.

RSVP: by  Wed 20 April

Other Pig Catching dates this year:

22 july
7 Oct

9 Dec

Please diarise!

Join our group on Facebook:

About Pig Catching:

Pig catching is what coaches and facilitators do when we chase the moment of insight that brings shift and transformation in our clients.

Please note: No pigs get harmed, our pigs are purely metaphorical and they have wings.

Bring your curiosity, your open minds and your questions.

Join us on Friday if you dare…

 

 

What is the difference between authentic leadership and the regular kind?

Join me and other coaches and facilitators as we discuss this and other questions at the

AUTHENTIC LEADERSHIP SYMPOSIUM

With distinguished guest Dr. Mark Rittenberg

Presented bu Drama for Life at Wits University

 Opening workshop:

Discover your Authentic Leadership through a unique combination of Communication, Coaching and Leadership. Most leaders have learned the essential analytical tools, however few are skilled at motivating, inspiring, and developing employees as a way to unleash their potential and to maximize their performance.

This three hour interactive workshop utilizes powerful theater techniques and cultural anthropology to acquire public speaking, communication and coaching skills. Learn how to engage in effective interpersonal exchanges, develop presenting and communication skills that make a powerful impression on your audience, and forge more productive relationships with co-workers.

Dr Mark Rittenberg, Professor of Leadership Communications, Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley, and his team create an interactive environment that challenges and trains participants to hone their leadership skills to create a high performance team.

 Provocations and conversations:

We invite delegates to present a 7 min provocation for conversation around the theme of leadership, business and the arts. The intention is to continue an interdisciplinary conversation that challenges current constructs around the relationship between business and the arts and to explore new possibilities, metaphors and language for how arts, particularly the applied arts,  and business can serve each other.

 Date:     18 March 2016

Programme:

9:30-10:00Tea/coffee and registration

10:00-13:00 workshop

13:00-13:30  Q and A over lunch

14:00-16:00 Provocations and conversations.

Investment: R250

Venue: 17th floor University corner building

Dress: Comfortable clothes you can stretch and move in

RSVP: by  Mon 14 March to petro.jansevanvuuren@wits.ac.za

Please indicate in your email if you would like to present a 7 min provocation. A provocation should present a dilemma, a quandary or a question for discussion around the theme of leadership, business and the arts. The programme makes room for 5 provocations.

 About Mark Rittenberg

For over twenty years, Dr. Mark Rittenberg has helped organizations create communities of excellence among their people and empowered individuals to become true leaders with the ability to actualize a vision — all through the power of communication. Dr. Rittenberg believes that important personal, social, and business problems can be effectively addressed using the Active Communicating methodology he developed — which draws upon the actor’s discipline of engaging, creative and effective communication.

Dr. Rittenberg’s experience extends around the globe, across cultures and across industries. In Israel in the 1970’s and 1980’s, he was able to use theatrical activities to build cultural bridges and develop mutual respect among the Israeli and Palestinian students in his workshops. In South Africa, he served as Professor of Education specializing in teacher training workshops in arts based education as an interventionist working with at-risk youths in disadvantaged situations. Based upon this work, Dr. Rittenberg was awarded the J. William Fulbright Senior Scholar Award and traveled to post-apartheid South Africa in an attempt to rebuild the self esteem and confidence that had been shattered in Black communities during years of segregation. In 1999, he was asked to return to Israel and apply his cultural conflict resolution experience in Middle East peace initiatives with the Young Leaders Network. Dr. Rittenberg served as both a mediator and communication specialist for the UNESCO Middle East Peace Process forum. He worked with leaders from Jordan, Israel, the Palestinian Authority, and Egypt on peaceful solutions to the Middle East conflict. Rittenberg led a special interest group symposium on arts- based programs for disadvantaged youth for use in community centers in the four countries.

Dr. Rittenberg is on the business and leadership communications faculty at the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business where he was awarded the The Earl F. Cheit Award For Excellence In Teaching . Additionally he currently teaches expressive communication and presentation in Executive Education Programs at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, the Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkeley, the University of San Francisco, the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University, and the Olin School of Business at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Rittenberg holds a Doctorate in International and Multicultural Education from the University of San Francisco. He also holds a Masters of Arts Degree in Interdisciplinary Studies in Education from San Francisco State and a Bachelor of Arts degree from University of California at Berkeley where he double majored in Education and Social Welfare.

 WE’RE LOOKING FORWARD TO WELCOMING YOU!

No more model citizens! What I learned at the ATKV this week.

ATKV Jeugleiersimposium

Dit was my voorreg om hierdie week, Maandag en Dinsdag, as spreker op te tree by die ATKV se Jeugleiersimposiums by die Goudini Spa naby Worcester en Buffelspoort naby Hartebeespoortdam.

My onderwerp: Vyf soorte weerstand teen leierskap en hoe om dit te hefboom. As jy daar was kan jy die opsomming hier aflaai in die vorm van die skyfie reeks wat ek gebruik het. As jy nie daar was nie, sal dit maar min sin maak vir jou.

Vyf soorte weerstabd teen leierskap

Translation:

It was my privilege to speak at the ATKV Youth Leaders symposia on Monday and Tuesday this week at Goudini Spa in the Western Cape and Buffelspoort in Gauteng.

My topic: Five types of resistance to leadership and how to leverage them. If you were there you can download the slide show above. If you were not there, it won’t make much sense to you.

Insights from this experience:

I am unable to divorce strategy and narrative from embodiment

I have come to distrust speaking as an effective way of bringing about change completely. There was a time when I thought that experiential interactive processes were mostly effective but that, now and then, speaking was still the best way. That idea might still be true for some and in certain contexts, but no longer for me and I can’t think of a context anymore where I would do it this way. It was my two talks at the ATKV Youth Leadership Symposiums this week that finalised this deduction for me.

Read about the five differences between SNE and motivational speaking.

The audience was wonderfully attentive, intelligent and as interactive as can be expected from 170 youngsters listening to a talk. And they were so beautifully compliant.

However, I wanted to interact with them more – hear about what erks them and talk about resistance. Being an applied theatre practitioner, I did interact, of course, but not in an embodied manner. It was mostly through conversation and feedback. They were model citizens, responding just like I would have wanted them to – if my talk was not about resistance. I no longer want neat well crafted processes where the audience do what the mode of presentation requires. I wanted some disagreement, some sparks. Yes, some resistance.

What I did in these talks was a combination of strategy and narrative, but it is the embodied part of the model that allows participants to interact with the narrative, the ‘story in the room’. If they don’t, it is left, for the most part, un-interrogated. The strategic narrative embodiment model of designing workshops and interventions is the model I developed over the last 7 years in my work in organisation development and leadership coaching.

I have made peace, I think, with the fact that no work I do creates any bangs and does not cause the populace to rise up in adoration. The work is too challenging and out of the ordinary. However, I have come to expect that I will love what I do. Interactive talking just did not do it for me here. I left feeling completely unmoved. That is just no good. So, if you want a 45 min to 1 hour talk on the five types of resistance to leadership and how to leverage them, forget it. I will rather ask for 90 min or 3 hours and do a truly Strategic Narrative Embodiment session.

It seems I am a one song bird.

Contact me to make a booking.

Pig Catching on 4 Dec: Moving people part 2

INVITATION TO CATCH PIGS

Topic:    Moving People

Date:     4 December 2015

Time:    7am for 7:15 to 10am Pig Catching

10:30-12:30 Research conversation (for all who are  interested in Strategic Narrative Embodiment)

NOTE: We will start at 7:15 sharp to make the most of our time.

Facilitator: Hamish Neill (from Drama for Life)

Cost: R250 (Includes a write-up of the session)

Venue: 305 Long Ave Ferndale

Dress: Comfortable clothes you can stretch and move in

Coffee, tea, muffins and fruit on arrival.

RSVP: by 1 December.

More on the topic:

What is this shift in leadership and Organisation Development that everyone is talking about?

Some call it a change from Command and Control to Sensing and Responding

Others say it is Autocratic to Participative Leadership

Some try to explain it by using metaphors for the kinds of Organisations we want e.g. no more machine like organisations, rather organic ones, or ones that work like the human brain. Still others say an organisation should be looked at as  a work of art…

There are also those that talk of a Vision and Values based culture versus a virtuoso culture, or a profit focussed organisation versus one that aims for a triple bottom line i.e. people planet and profit.

Whatever the shift is that our new changing world is asking for, we are the ones that support the transformation.

In this session, we will continue our foray into the symbols, metaphors and images that make up our understanding of this shift with Hamish from Dram for Life. In doing so you will also get insight into the tool called Image Theatre as a means for extracting and eliciting stories from participants.

Read my reflections on our previous session here: Can Image Theatre help us change organisational life in South Africa?

About Pig Catching:

Pig catching is what coaches and facilitators do when we chase the moment of insight that brings shift and transformation in our clients.

Please note: No pigs get harmed, our pigs are purely metaphorical and they have wings.

Bring your curiosity, your open minds and your questions.

Join us on Friday if you dare…

Can Image Theatre help us find ways to change organisational life in South Africa?

Does this pig have wings?

On Friday 18 Sep 18 facilitators and coaches from the Playing Mantis Pig Catching group came together to experiment with Image Theatre.

Pig catching is what facilitators and coaches do when we search for that moment of shift and transformation that helps people move.

Image Theatre is a form of applied theatre designed and practised by Brazilian director and activist Augusto Boal. It uses body images to express collective perspectives on a chosen issue and to explore ways to transform these perspectives and experiment with alternative ways to act.

What we want to do

Our intention for the workshop is to explore the shift in Leadership styles and Organisation Development that we are noticing and that many of us are supporting. The shift seems to be characterised by a movement from command and control styles of leadership to participative sensing and responding styles; from looking at organisations as machines to seeing them either as living organisms, complex networks like the human brain or works of art; from organisations that focus on a single bottom line (profit) to one that has a triple bottom line (people planet and profit).

We are particularly interested in a transition in South Africa from organisations that cam rise above colonialism, apartheid and corruption to ones that work towards social equality, prosperity for all and happy working people from leaders to workers – in short, organisations that support the South African 12030 vision.

We choose to work with Image Theatre as methodology this time in order to explore the metaphors, symbols, language and images that help us talk about the shift and about our vision for leaders and organisations in South Africa.

An account of a transitional moment – a flying pig:

Image 1 - SilosWe are halfway through our workshop and we are exploring one of the typical ways in which organisations are described: the silo syndrome. We work in groups of 4 and begin to build group images. We do not go one person at a time. We simply step forward all at once and create the image. While we

maintain our image the facilitator (Hamish Neil from Drama for Life) asks us to look around and see all the images in the room.

In most groups people are standing either with their backs to each other, but touching, or facing each other but standing separately, doing their work. Hamish instructs us to reverse everything we are doing and create the opposite image. He gives a countdown and everyone moves together. We find ourselves in an ideal opposite configuration. Most people are standing in circles hugging each other. In two of the groups three are turned towards one another hugging or reaching out while one person is turned out and doing something different from the group.

Everyone gasps or laughs. “Does this always happen?”

“Yes,” I say, “people always end up in circles holding hands or hugging. My instruction to Hamish was to make sure we do not end here.”

Hamish invites the two groups where all are turned in and hugging to explore this image. “Stay there for a while. How does it feel as time passes? Still comfortable? Without breaking the configuration, start moving across the floor. Now jump. Go get the photo copier and fetch the printing…

Everyone is laughing.Image 2 - Hugs

Moans and groans emit from the groups.

“Too much breathing into the centre.”

“I am worried about the garlic I had for supper.”

“Can i please just go back to being a silo.”

It is clear from the activity that no-one can get any work done in this configuration. They are increasingly uncomfortable and getting too hot.

We can understand why silo’s happen.

We acknowledge that there was no big stick beating people into silo’s. It happens because it works on some level.

This ideal image is often a respite from the original problem image, but not sustainable. By working with the image its unfeasibility as a long-term solution is recognised. As with the original silo image, is important that this image too is arrived at through spontaneous action and not planning.

Now we are instructed to work together to discover what image goes in between the first two. What is the image of transition between, in this case silo’s and huggy-huggy. We are given some time to talk with each other and work this out. When we have our transitional image, each small group shows it to the large group one by one. Again on lookers say what they see before the group responds.

“Can we also explore what the next step could be after ‘huggy-huggy’, instead of exploring transitional images?” someone asks.

Hamish answers that this is not usually helpful because it does not take us into difficult places. It does not help us process. From the ideal embracing image, people might just go back to the silos because that is what they know. It is true that people want respite from the silo’s and the isolation, but they can’t sustain it, so they may just go back. It keeps us in dreamland where we can plan and desire and vision things that do not get real. We have to take them where it gets messy so that they can find something new, something that is not there, something that can bring shift.

“Is this about ‘thesis, antithesis and synthesis?” comes another question..

Hamish answers: “Be careful to try and neaten up the mess too quickly. It is not helpful to begin to judge and see some images as ‘better’ or ‘more synthesis” than others yet. Just stay in the direct response and action space without making sense of it yet. Stay in the bodies, don;t go into the head yet.

From the transitional images we learn that here there is the most aImage 3 - interconnectednessmount of eye contact, dybamic movement and interaction. There is more laughter, more frustration, more mess and more noise. There also seems to be a theme of disconnection and reconnection running through. Two of the images resemble dancing and the other two show lots of open arms but not so much touching.

We decide to pick up this exploration again next time we meet on 27 November. We want to go deeper into the transitional images and understand more about how they might inform our own transitional work.

Join us on 27 November for Moving people Part 2.

Time: 7 to 10 am

Venue: 305 Long Avenue, Ferndale, Johannesburg

 

Pig Catching on Sep 18: Moving People

What is this shift in leadership and Organisation Development that everyone is talking about?

  • Some call it a change from Command and Control to Sensing and Responding
  • Others say it is Autocratic to Participative Leadership
  • Some try to explain it by using metaphors for the kinds of Organisations we want e.g. no more machine like organisations, rather organic ones, or ones that work like the human brain. Still others say an organisation should be looked at as  a work of art…
  • There are also those that talk of a Vision and Values based culture versus a virtuoso culture, or a profit focussed organisation versus one that aims for a triple bottom line i.e. people planet and profit.

Whatever the shift is that our new changing world is asking for, we are the ones that support the transformation.

This month’s session is devoted to coming to grips with this shift collectively. I invited Kathy Barolsky from Drama for Life to facilitate a session with us using Image Theatre as tool to access stories, language, metaphors and symbols that will help us make sense of this shift in leadership and OD that we are all part of. In doing so you will also get insight into the tool called Image Theatre as a means for extracting and eliciting stories from participants.

Bring your curiosity, your open minds and your questions.

Details

Date: 18 Sep

Venue: 305 Long Ave Ferndale
Coffee, tea, muffins and fruit on arrival

Time:    7am for 7:15 -10am Pig                 Catching
10:30-12:30 Research conversation (for all who are  interested in Strategic Narrative Embodiment)
NOTE: We will start at 7:15 sharp to make the most of our time.

Facilitator: Kathy Barolsky (from Drama for Life)

Cost: R250 (Includes a write-up of the session)

Dress: Comfortable clothes you can stretch and move in

Click here if you want to attend

pm-logoMore on Pig Catching

Pig catching is what coaches and facilitators do when we chase the moment of insight that brings shift and transformation in our clients.

The Pig Catching event is hosted by Playing Mantis Coaching and Facilitation (Pty) Ltd

NOTE: no real pigs get harmed during the course of our work, we play only in the metaphoric sense and all our pigs have wings)

All our pig catching sessions are geared to learning new techniques for helping our clients to insight, break through and sustainable transformation. More specifically, we look at using methods and techniques from the performing arts. We have found that this is an untapped world of wealth where metaphoric work, embodied experiences and group imagination can bring about powerful transformations.

Click here if you want to attend

Why did Luke’s family and Obi Wan have to die?

Starcon logo
Starcon logo

As I prepare for my talk at Starcon on Tjhu, I wonder:

  1. Why did Luke’s family have to be killed before hewas willing to go with Obi Wan ti help Princess Lea?
  2. Can such tragedy in your own life, and more importantly, the lives of your audience members be spared by listening to stories?
  3. Why did Obi Wan have to die too? Could Luke not find the force if he stayed alive?
  4. If we as speakers are the Obi Wans for the Lukes in our audiences, do we also have to die? How?

The talk I will be giving is the “Seven Story Secrets for Speakers” illustrated by the journey of Luke Skywalker from Starwars episodes 4 to 6. Reflect with me on the role you want to play for your audience members and the role stories play in your talks. On Thu I will be sharing three ways in which to use stories: Telling the story, letting the audience consider their stories and using a story as the design inspiration for a talk. The Seven Story Secrets for Speakers use the first two ways, but explains the third in greater detail. More about Starcon: Toastmasters International in Southern Africa’s May Conference is happening this week from 14-16 May 2015. Our team is all about finding excellence and reaching beyond your perceived limitations. And so, the theme of “Reach for the Stars” was born and all things Star Wars and Star Trek were adopted. I have been asked, in the words of the organisasers to “joining Starfleet in the fight against the evil forces of Glossophobia.” What does this mean? do I suffer from it unknowingly? I  look forward to sharing stories with all the delegates and speakers.

Dr. Petro Janse van Vuuren

Researcher, Speaker and Coach

Need a speaking coach? Contact Petro

Interested in a course in facilitation and coaching? Click here

Looking for a speaker or storyteller at your event? Contact Petro

Story Secrets for Speakers #7 – Die with grace

Can you remember the shock you felt in the Lion King when Simb’s father, Mufasa dies? Or when Gandalf is overcome in the dwarf’s mountain? Or in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince when Dumbledore is slain? Or in Star Wars when Obi Wan Kenobi is killed by Darth Vader? Stories teach us that every mentor or guide must die, otherwise the hero cannot learn to stand on his own. This is the seventh and final story secret for now. If you had managed to fulfil your duty in all of the other six secrets, you must die as the guide to those in your audience. If there is one pain all speakers feel, it is the fact that they only have a short time to influence their listeners and then it is over. Heartbreaking statistics do their rounds: Only 12% of an audience are actually listening, the others are worrying, daydreaming, thinking about lunch or, surprise, religion (recorded by Paul Cameron; assistant Professor at Wayne State University). People remember only 10% of what they hear and 20% of what they see (Edgar Dale’s Cone of Experience). How do you make the best of the little time you have?

Let us review secrets number 1 to 6:

  1. Paint a picture of the possibility contrasted with the pain of the current reality.
  2. Call on the Hero’s Character This is the chosen one, the one whom the prophesies mention
  3. Demonstrate your magic: by providing a personalised tool
  4. Your secret weapon and the power of 3,5 and 7
  5. Introduce the travelling companions so they know who is in it with them
  6. Reframe the situation with a fresh perspective when the pawpaw hits the fan

Then, when Simba is at his most desperate, he looks into the sky and sees an image of Mufasa calling to him: “Remember who you are.” Gandalf reappears when he is most needed as a white wizard, Dubledore find Harry in a dream-like limbo place to guide him one last time and Obi Wan appears in a flickering of the Force as Luke seeks aid. As speaker, you too can engineer such a re-appearance at the request of the hero in your audience. Five ways to reappear:

  1. Promise them an eBook if they give you their contact details. Time your eBook so that it reaches them within 30 days before they have forgotten you.
  2. Let them sign-up for your news letter. Now you can appear to them every 30 days. Motivate them to sign up by doing a lucky draw on all the sighn-up forms you collected.
  3. Give them a worthwhile gift like a book or CD with some of your wisdom in it. Mind you, course notes don’t work so well because they are too easy to throw away. It is much harder to throw away a book or CD.
  4. Give them a free App to download.
  5. Ask them to tick different boxes for how they want to stay in touch so you can friend them on Facebook, connect with them on Linkedin or give them a personal call, if that is one of the options. People love this one, I have done it and even though they ticked the box that I may call them, they are always surprised when I do.

The trick is, here that they must be able to find you when they look for you. It must be their choice. IF you appear to them in emails or calls without their request or agreement, they may confuse you with the villain of the story. Villains appear when you don’t want them and they are invasive, disrespectful and intrusive. Villains get killed and do not come back from the dead – or if they do, they become super villains or arch enemies… Better to die with grace and reappear as a surprise in a dream than die in disgrace and become a nightmare. Dr. Petro Janse van Vuuren Researcher, Speaker and Coach Need a speaking coach? Contact Petro Interested in a course in facilitation and coaching? Click here Looking for a speaker or storyteller at your event? Contact Petro

Dr. Petro Janse van Vuuren

Researcher, Speaker and Coach

Need a speaking coach? Contact Petro

Interested in a course in facilitation and coaching? Click here

Looking for a speaker or storyteller at your event? Contact Petro

EVENT: Pig Catching on 8 May

What would the tools you use say if they could talk?

Catch a Flying Pig
Catch a Flying Pig

If your technology, your materials or props could talk to you, they might have interesting opinions and suggestions about your facilitation, your coaching or even the way you run your business.. They may have ideas about how to improve the potential for catching pigs. For those who don’t know what I am on about, read more about catching pigs below.

This session will be especially helpful if you have questions around tools, materials and technology relating to your coaching/facilitation practise. Questions like:

  • Do you want new tools to help you make a pointIs your newsletter stuck?
  • Is your marketing system not working for you?
  • Is your computer frustrating you?
  • Are you wondering what form your facilitator guide or workbook should take?
  • Would you like to use more props?

We look forward to being inspired by you!

DETAILS:

Date: Fri 8 May
Time: 7 am to 9:30 am
Place: 305 Long Avenue, Ferndale.
Cost: R200 or R150 if you are still in the first year after attending the Playing Mantis Essentials Master Course in Coaching and Facilitation.
Coffee, tea, muffins and fresh fruit on arrival.

More on Pig catching

Pig catching is what coaches and facilitators do when we chase the moment of insight that brings shift and transformation in our clients.

NOTE: no real pigs get harmed during the course of our work, we play only in the metaphoric sense and all our pigs have wings)

All our pig catching sessions are geared to learning new techniques for helping our clients to insight, break through and sustainable transformation. More specifically, we look at using methods and techniques from the performing arts. We have found that this is an untapped world of wealth where metaphoric work, embodied experiences and group imagination can bring about powerful transformations.

Click here if you want to attend